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for the american people. opposition mounts to the nsa's mass collection of the phone records of millions of americans, the guardian reveals the existence of another secret contractxkeyscore, the barely everything the user does on the internet including e- mail, online chats, and browsing history. we will speak to spencer ackerman and longtime innocent expert journalist james bamford. his most recent article is headlined, "they know much more than you think." >> they claim we are only doing international, only doing foreign communications. when you're asking for local phone calls throughout the united states, everybody in the united states on a daily basis, where is the truth in all of these claims? >> all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the sentencing hearing for army whistleblower bradley manning began wednesday with a prosecution witness undermining the state's own claims manning's disclosures to wikileaks harm the united states. on wednesday, retired brigadier general robert carr, who oversaw the pentagon
it was harsh. how about those people who lied to the congress that represents the people about the nsa activities and bold faced lies saying they did not spy on americans? that is all i have to say. what you think about the sentence to reprimanding and what others would do if they provide that type of information? those in the future might provide this type of information to the public as well? caller: i would like to echo the previous gentleman's comments, and that is they did take an oath. at what point does your --scious do the right thing it is really a tough question. he did break his oath. at the same time, at what point is there a point when you should break the oath when it is for the greater good? >> usa today reflects hemlines and other papers. nsa admits new privacy violations. kevin johnson writing about the top intelligence officials here yen . there are other accounts of the story as well. theheard some thoughts on 35-year sentence handed down. you could make your thoughts known as well. kentucky up next. archie on the independent line. good morning. personally i think th
, the nsa's own internal audit reveals the agency has broken its own privacy rules and overstepped its legal authority thousands of times a year. then we go to cairo where the muslim brotherhood has called for a day of rage after more than 600 people were killed on wednesday. >> the one thing people will not stand for in the long term is to have this kind of regressive security state inflicted upon them. once the targets of this authoritarian apparatus moves away from the islamists and starts imposing itself on other parts of egyptian society, then perhaps,e might see, once again a popular uprising against that kind of crackdown. >> we will speak with sharif abdel kouddous in cairo and p.j. crowley, former state department spokesperson, who is called for the u.s. to suspend military aid to egypt and call the ouster of mohamed morsi a coup. then, didn't eight-year-old spy for america? we look at how u.s. allies in yemen used a child the place electronic chips on the man he considered to be his surrogate father. days later, the man was killed in u.s. drone strike. all of that and more coming u
the nsa's past surveillance capabilities. >> the director of national intelligence james clapper went to the u.s. senate and the senate said, are you collecting data on minds of americans? he said, no. the very first sure he we did show they were collecting -- story we did showed they were collecting data. is ann, hasan rouhani upgraded as arends to president replacing mahmoud ahmadinejad. >> if you want the right response, don't stick with a ran in the language of -- don't speak with a ran. >> we will speak with trita parsi. all of that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the obama administration has announced it will keep 19 embassies in north africa and the middle east closed from to a week due to fears of a possible military threat. ramped up security measures were in place over the weekend that some of the 22 diplomatic posts shattered by the concerns. saxby chambliss, the top republican on the senate intelligence committee, said intercepted communications were reminiscent of what was heard before the 9/11 attac
the ease with which the nsa by the push of a button, whether deliberate or accidental, can get large volumes of u.s. communications. >> reporter: "the washington post" reporter that broke the story says the internal nsa audit leaked to him by edward snowden contains more information than is provided to congressional oversite committees. dianne feinstein said in a written statement the committee quote, can and should do more to independently verify that nsa's operations are appropriate. but the aclu's michelle richardson asks how. >> members of congress have been clear, they have not received a full explanation how the programs worked or any clients' problems with privacy regulations. >> reporter: an nsa tutorial instructs analysts not to give extraneous information to congressional overseers. the president says there's no indication the agency is abusing its powers. >> what you're not reading about is the government actually abusing these programs. what you're hearing about is the prospect that these could be abused. >> reporter: the nsa is now drawing fire from the left and right, w
, the new nsa documents. they are -- their spy something worse than we ever knew they have read our emails and listened to our phone calls thousands of times a year. simple mistakes or a pattern of abuse. tonight, the latest leak about the nsa. and, a paralimp i don't paraolympian denied a chance because she could walk again some day. >> i didn't expect this at all. it's pretty shocking. >> they landed her a loss tonight before she could even get in the game. still, this teenager isn't finished with her fight. plus, it's been cloaked in mystery since its creation. >> welcome to area 51. >> now the cia decleafs documents that show what really went on at area 51. why are some sections still a secret? and that is first from fox this friday night. no little green men. no flying saucers. but after decades of denying that area 51 exists now an admission. the documents prove it is very real. but the conspiracy theories are going nowhere. not by a long shot. area 51 is the then secret base in the middle of the nevada desert. about 90 miles north of vegas. the documents that the cia just declassifi
's rumors that there's more to come in these disclosures. whistle blowers have suggested the n.s.a. whistle blower that there's more that we don't know that we should though. will you or will some of your colleagues, are you willing to use the privilege that constitutional privilege that's outlined and used in the 1960 to see put that into the record so that we, the public can see that kind of thing? >> you're referring to the speech and debate in the constitution. we've already gone so far beyond that in what's already been disclosed. every time there's a new disclose that you are comes out, the people in charge, like general alexander are asked is there anything else. they always say no, and then there's something else. >> i got to ask one last question on this topic, before we go to the break. you know, you mentioned the fourth amendment. i know that you've got to include it in one of the bills, the provision sailing that you can't vital the fourth amendment, but they're clearly vitals it with this spying. i can't imagine how it would be a matter of dispute. it's the most plain reading a
lawmakers are vowing more oversight amid a new report that the nsa routinely broke privacy rules in its controversial surveillance program. according to "the washington post," the nsa exceeded its legal authority thousands of times since 2008 with unauthorized surveillance of americans or foreign targets on u.s. soil. senate judiciary chairman pat leahy says he plans to hold another hearing on the nsa surveillance program. house speaker nancy pelosi called the report, quote, extremely disturbing in a statement saying in part, congress must conduct rigorous oversight to ensure that all incidents, all incidents of noncompliance are reported to the oversight committees and the fisa court in a timely and comprehensive manner and that appropriate steps are taken to ensure violations are not repeated. the report stems from an nsa audit obtained by the post from leaker edward snowden. kelly o'donnell joins me now. what kind of privacy violations are we talking about? >> what we're learning so far, these are not instances of eavesdropping on conversations or reading e-mails. it's not that kind
bombshell rocking the nsa. new reports reveal the intelligence agency violated privacy rules thousands of times since 2008. >>> plus a "day of rage" sweeping across egypt today. at least 17 people dead already as thousands take to the streets in response to the bloody crack down early they are week that killed 600. >>> and a new book blowing some holes in the age-old rules of pregnancy. are alcohol and caffeine really off limits? it's all "happening now." jon: but we begin on this friday morning with stunning new developments in the nsa spying scandal. new reports the intelligence agency has broken privacy rules or overstepped its legal authority thousands of times each year since 2008. good morning to you, i'm jon scott. >> i'm allison cam rot tax in for general that lee. jon: mice to have you here. >> we have a lot of news, because details come from nsa leaker edward snowden. he shared them with the "washington post." we have infractions was unauthorized surveillance of u.s. citizens. >> a lot of what happens in the agency, even the nsa is reflection of the culture they see from the
. and another surprise headline on what the nsa is up to. an internal review shows the intel outfit broke its own rule thousands times. good morning from washington. it's friday, august 16th, 2013. and this is "the daily rundown." we're watching developing news out of egypt. the country bracing for more bloodshed today. tens of thousands of muslim brotherhood members and their supports are responding to calls for a day of rage. pouring into the streets to protest this week's brutal government crackdown. we're watching crowds demonstrators crossing a bridge through cairo. most likely trying to make its way to the square where morsi supporters are gathering. in direct defiance to the state of emergency. the army has been giving the green light to use live ammunition against the protesters. troops have been deployed to guard police and state buildings. they've set up road blocks at key junctions. there are some reports now of deadly clashes around egypt as well. the official death toll stands at 638. with nearly 4,000 people wounded. the government crackdown has sparked criticism from all corner
.s. embassies. on friday president obama announced proposals to change the oversight and transparency of the nsa. speakers included congressman peter king who chairs the homeland security subcommittee on counterterrorism and intelligence, former new york times reporter judith miller and fox business network host john stossel. the event was cohosted by the manhattan institute, the weekly standard and the group concerned veterans for america. >> we want to thank you all for coming. i'm not normally intimidated when i speak at these events, but now that i didn't realize gunny sergeant duff was here, now i'm very worried. [laughter] it's great to have all of you. i also want to join in thanking those of you who serve for your service and to say how pleased i am that pete king and john stossel have agreed to be here and also judy miller and gary bernstein who will be joining us for the panel. pete, when i saw -- i saw pete in afghanistan, i was visiting with a couple of people looking around for about a week in late 2011, and pete had volunteered, reuped and gone to afghanistan then to help train the
issues which are front and center on the minds of many americans. >> don't put the nsa with the irs. they are totally different problems and issues and i believe there is ample evidence that the irs abused the player and daughter liz a political candidate. words from the father/daughter duomaking headlines. >> i am harris faulkner. how will the united states respond to the crisis in syria that has millions of people pouring over the borders trying to escape the slaughter house that their country has become. it could create now havens for terrorist and american national security time talked about the next step and talked about what is unfolding, pictures that are so hard to look at and impossible to aunticate and seem to go along with chemical attacks in syria. and more on the high level meeting for you. and first a deadly game of back and forth played out at this houred in of syria. they are accusing the anti- government rebels of using chemical weapons and others call that a thinly veiled attempt from the nerve gas assault on a neighborhood they say. defense secretary chuck hagel a
new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good morning to you, with us today, is arthel neville. in for jenna lee. arthel: we'll start with this, jon. a-team of u.n. inspectors coming under sniper fire in damascus. a spokesman saying it happened while they were on their way to inspect the site where hundreds of people were killed in a reported chemical attack last week. for days syria wouldn't let the team go near the site. the government finally agreeing to allow the inspectors to visit that starting today but a senior u.s. official dismissed the offer as too late to be credible saying crucial evidence could have already been destroyed. leland vittert is live in
. a check of the numbers coming up. and this morning n-s-a leaker edward snowden was finally able to leave the moscow airport after being held there for more than a month. details on why he was released, coming up. >>darya:a second bart strike is looming as union contracts are set to expire on sunday night sending union workers back to the picket line, and leaving hundreds of thousands of bay area commuters stranded come monday morning. kron fours mike pelton is live at west oakland where negotiations are set to fat resume today. good morning mike. >>: here you can see bart and its labor unions by now you know when of the biggest issues on the two sides are pay increases. they want to offer any percent raise but the workers are asking for a 21 percent raise over the same period with his three years. both sides said both proposals they receive financial we don't make sense. they have agreed to meet each day this week and hopes to find some common ground. >>: until we make progress on both a safety proposals that the union has advanced to which the district has had no response and to t
.s. surveillance programs and faces tough questions about the nsa leaker. >> i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. >> the debate over the future of u.s. spying programs. mike mccaul, the head of the house homeland security committee. analysis from ted koppel of nbc news and "the washington post's" barton gellman. then presidential orders. strong words from the commander in chief this week about stamping out sexual assault in the military. the pentagon is preparing new rules, but there is an agreement on how to end the crisis. i go one-on-one with one of the lawmakers pushing for change, missouri senator claire mccaskill. >>> the immigration debate. a critical time for reform as members of congress head back to their districts to prepare for the fall fight. what are the prospects for passage? talk to both sides including the congressmen leading the fight against reform. >>> end of an era. the venerable "the washington post" is sold to amazon's jeff bez bezos. was what does it say about the future of traditional media? inside analyst from "the washington post's" david ignatius and dav
. today we are finding out that according to the "wall street journal" that the u.s. government, the nsa is spying on, i don't know what word you want to use, but surveilling 75% of online communications. nsa built a surveillance network than officials have publicly showed. it can reach 75% of all u.s. internet traffic. this is days after the british government destroyed laptops that supposedly had information from edward snowden's files on it. i mean, what are the repercussions of this? >> i want to say one can be disturbed about what was done to glenn greenwald's partner and one can be concerned about the extent that is being revealed by the snowden leaks about nsa leaking. one can be disturbed by all of those things. being disturbed and concerned and the general march towards secrecy does not thereby say and bradley manning should be pardoned or released. i just want to make that clear, that those -- one can be properly concerned about all of those things and think that the snowden effect is more good than bad, but that -- again, i would say that doesn't mean that all bets are off and
putin. remember this image from back in june? say a little frosty you think between putin and obama? nsa leaker ed snowden has been granted asylum through vladmir putin in russia to remain there up through one year. it could be extended. perhaps after hanking out at the airport for a month 1/2. there are a lot of questions if a united states president and sit side by side with vladmir putin at a time when he granted american citizen, snowden asylum. that may not happen. at the same time the g20 summit will take place in st. petersburg, russia. we have all reason to think that will take place and there will be a moment where the president and vladmir putin will see each other and talk to each other and perhaps see a picture other than the one frozen in time. >> that will be interesting. bill: president obama speaking on the global terror threat for the first time to jay leno on late night. was the set after late-night talk show for the comments that have now closed 20 u.s. embassies? we'll debate that. >> the shooter questioning the victims. major nidal hasan with his opening statement th
you are on all of those nsa stuff. this is what's going to happen. all of our conspiracy theory friends are going to say i deliberately waited to do all of the stuff when jim wasn't here. and my story is that he's having a colonoscopy. not here to defend himself. no, we've been getting into -- what would you call it, chris, a spirited debate. >> yes. >> stephanie: about the nsa stuff and snowden, hero, traitor, blah, blah, blah. anyway, paul in houston writes steph, listening to jim ward talk about the nsa makes me want to pull my eyelashes out. this is the same guy who says the founders couldn't have imagined assault weapons when writing the second amendment. paul in houston. [ applause ] i just -- i just think -- and again, you can fill in for jim and say i'm an idiot. but it is a tough balance between security and privacy. you can't have 100%. i don't think of either. >> are there ways to give up less of your -- i don't want to say freedom but when you engage in facebook and twitter, you are engaging in perhaps an arena that might allow you to be spied on more so that you do
that was disclosed that kicked off this whole controversy is due to expire tomorrow. is the nsa seeking a renewal? >> i have nothing to say today about that. >> will you have something to say tomorrow? >> i will. >> will it be modified? [laughter] >> i cannot say anymore at the moment. >> can i say something in defense of anthony? i want him to continue to love me. i think there should be an expectation of protection, of lawyer and client communications. that has always been the tradition. it is generally respected. there was a 1979 supreme court case referenced this morning. there is no constitutionally protected expectation that phone numbers called will not be disclosed. that is the basis on which we should begin to talk about this. but coming back to congress, congress can narrow whatever is the standard to go before the fisa court to get an individualized warrant.that's what the fourth amendment requires. --re was a decision i'm sure it will be revisited. it would have required that of the court -- that the case deal with specific facts creating a reasonable suspicion that a person is of a f
surveillance program so many people are talking about, including a change in how the nsa collects phone records, more transparency by the secret foreign intelligence court, that's the fisa court, and the creation of a task force of private citizens. joining me this morning barton gellman of "the washington post" who has been writing extensively about edward snowden and the nsa, special correspondent for nbc news ted koppel, and the chairman of the house homeland security committee, republican congressman mike mccaul. barton gellman, let me start with you. has edward snowden won? has he accomplished what he set out to do, which is not only get a debate going but force change in these programs? >> he has accomplished far more than anyone in his position could have reasonably hoped to have accomplished. he told me his greatest fear was that he would come out and do this and whole story would be -- you know, roiling around for a day and it would be gone. now you have president obama being forced to say that he welcomes the debate, which he welcomes sort of like the ceo who gets an ang
. >> critics are refuting many claims the obama administration made by the nsa data collection program. that is leaving many worried about the security of their personal information and wondering whether or not the agency is playing by the rules. chief intelligence correspondent catherine herridge has more now from washington. hi, catherine. have we reach ad tipping. >> reporter: patti ann, according to aclu at least 20 pieces of legislation are being considered to modify the nsa program adding the white house continues to disappoint its base on the issue. >> i think the white house has lost credibility and i think the government generally has been operating with a deficit of trust in the area of surveillance for the past few years. they have been saying one thing publicly to congress and to the courts and turns out that quite another thing has been taking place behind closed doors. >> reporter: in the end the aclu alleges that the nsa plays word games under the set of rules known as the united states intelligence directive 18, collecting data only applies when the data is analyzed and
. it is the biggest hate crime hoax of the year. and nsa is not only spying on millions of americans but lots of time using expensive resources to keep track of their love lives. and a founding twist and a new department of defense training manual dedicates a extremist behavior is the same that wanted to overthrow british rule. we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. this labor day, don't invest in a mattress until you visit a sleep number store. once you experience it, there's no going back. oh, yeah! at our biggest sale of the year, every bed is on sale. queen mattresses now start at just $599. and through labor day only, save 50% on our limited edition memory foam mattress sets. only at a sleep number store. sleep number. comfort individualized. mayo? corn dogs? you are so outta here! aah! [ female announcer ] the complete balanced nutrition of great-tasting ensure. 24 vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, and 9 grams of protein. [ bottle ] ensure®. nutrition inharge™. >> brand new developments in the brutal beating death of a world war ii vet rap. 88-year-old dell better be
begins a week-long family vacation. among the likely topics today, obamacare, the nsa, the terror threat overseas and our bumpy relationship with russia. joining me now for her take on what to expect today is monica crowley, fox news contributor. monica, always good to have you with us here on "happening now." the president, he is facing some questions today from the quote, unquote, news media as opposed to what he did the other night on tuesday with jay leno which is a softer approach. what do you think he is going to face today? >> actually jay leno asked him tougher questions. kelly: good for jay leno. >> sometimes than we see from the white house press corps, right? the president does in press conferences. he runs out the clock and take a question and tends to filibuster. i have a feeling this press conference lasts about an hour which is usually the time frame, he will run out the clock and run out the door to his vacation. i expect he will get a couple questions on nsa. for example he told jay leno earlier this week that the u.s. does not have a domestic spying program yet "the new
a break. >>> in the meantime, no way to the nsa. why the lawmakers are saying the best way to defund the agency right now. the "cashin' in" crew is all over it at the bottom of the hour. >>> one of the largest stock exchanges stopped cold for three hours. they're calling it technical difficulties. when i first felt the diabetic nerve pain, of course i had no idea what it was. i felt like my feet were going to sleep. it progressed from there to burning... to like 1,000 bees that were just stinging my feet. [ female announcer ] it's known that diabetes damages nerves. lyrica is fda approved to treat diabetic nerve pain. lyrica is not for everyone. it may cause rious allergic reactions or suicidal thoughts or actions. tell your doctor right ay if you have these, new or worsening depression, or unusual changes in md or behavior. or swelling, trouble breathing, rash, hives, blisters, changes in eyesight including blurry vision, muscle pain with fever, tired feeling, or skin sores friabetes. common side effects are dizziness, sleepiness, weight gain and swelling of hands, legs and feet. do
-- >> the philosophical objection to all the nsa programs is that you don't want the government. everyone knows that amazon has all of your information. so does, you know, your online grocer who takes your food order every week. this is about the federal government having too much information and too much control over their lives. >> like they don't have it already. >> as a stout nra member, i'm upset to know they may know what i'm doing, how i'm doing, what i'm doing with i many guns. >> where you keep them in your east hampton cottage. >> east hampton, it's ammo city out there. >> yes, i just heard from someone, a concerned viewer that when we say guns, we're not talking about your biceps. >> oh, there you go. >> okay. talking of surveillance. government programs. >> we want to see them today. you have three hours for you to reveal your guns. >> no, no, no. >> this is marketing. marketing is for the consumer's needs. obviously there's a consumer need out there to see the biceps. so we will, as marketers, as journalists. yes, that will happen at 8:00. >> it won't. i promise you, it really won'
qaeda's on the rise in this part of the world. the nsa program is proving its worth yet again. but we need to reevaluate where we're at in light of these threats. sequestration has to be fixed. if this happens a year from now, intelligence community and military will be less capable. afrikom needs to be beefed up. that's where the war is going. we're about to withdraw from afghanistan. i don't want afghanistan to become iraq where we withdraw our troops and the terrorists come back. i appreciate what the administration is doing. they're taging the right approach to this. benghazi was a complete failure. the threats were real there. the reporting was real. and we basically dropped the ball. we've learned from benghazi, thank god, and the administration is doing this right. >> let me ask you, when you look at this map of u.s. embassies that are closed or consulates or missions, 22 of them, most of them across the muslim world, when you hear this global warning to all americans to take ca care, what do you think that says if the mission is to terrorize. in some sense, you feel like they'
if you look upon it favorably. >> bob? do you have anything to add about our wonderful nsa state and how -- >> well, i want to -- anthonyys judgment that i believe what has been revealed recently truly is unprecedented. the power of the government, with current technology, to know where we are, and to a very high degree what we're doing every single minute of the day and night, is the stuff of which novels might have been made but it would have been too ridiculous for any novelist to embrace. it would have required to great 0 suspension of belief by the readers, and a reality that grows steadily worse. there is now a huge industry valued at something in the neighborhood of 80 to $100 billion annually. we don't really know because it's black budgets. and the people in this industry, which involves hundreds of thousands, and perhaps even millionsed of employees of i.t. companies, are working fulltime to strengthen, to widen, to intensify, all the techniques already developed, to know even more about every one of us and, endearing everyone else on the earth that they can know about. and wit
nsa surveillance programs. >> i had the programs reviewed. we put in some additional safeguards to make sure there's federal court oversight as well as congressional oversight, that there is no spying on americans. >> reporter: even top democrats previously question whether that oversight is real. >> it is not possible for the congress to do the kind of vigorous oversight that the president spoke about if you can't get straight answers. >> reporter: democrat ron wyden referring to this answer he got from james clapper, the director of national intelligence. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of america americans. >> no, sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. >> reporter: the president stressed privacy is protected. >> none of the revelations show that government actually abused these powers. >> reporter: yet key lawmakers insist they do not have enough information to verify that claim. >> members of congress were not aware on the whole about what these programs were being used for, the extent to which they are being used. >> repor
of vladimir putin. as for nsa leaker edward snowden, carney said the u.s. does want snowden back but it's not the highest priority of this administration. here's what karn he had to say. >> we had a lot of fish to fry, if you will, with the russians. we have a lot of issues to engage with the russians over. there and is two plus two ministerial meeting tomorrow here in washington and, you know, there will be a host of topics. so this is not the focus of our engage pent with russia but it is not something that we're dropping by any means. >> as to some of those programs that snowden apparently leaked, the "new york times" had a story out this morning that says that the united states might be sweeping up and sifting through more e-mails from people in the united states than what was previously acknowledged. carney said during the briefing that the nsa tries to keep that to a minute month. >> if joe schmo from cocoamoe wants to know if his e-mail is being read, what would you say? >> it's not being read. there are procedures in place, as i just described. i'm sure the nsa can explain to yo
're going see happen is that there's going to be much more robust oversight over the n.s.a. there is failed oversight right now. and the fact that there is all this activity going on that we don't know about, and they spoon-feed to the intelligence committees of both houses what they want to tell them. and for any of us to say that we know what's going on in the n.s.a. i would find very suspect. i think we've got to provide whistle-blower protection to those who serve in the intelligence community so there is somewhere they can go to report misdeeds without being subject to criminal prosecution. >> schieffer: do you think that edward snowden was a whistle blower? he's being called everything from a whistle blow? he's being called everything from a traitor to a defector because he leaked some of this information. >> i think jury is still out on whether he's a trait oregon a whistle-blower. but i do think he has highlighted some extraordinary misdeeds and i do think that we've got to create an avenue so that persons within the military, if persons within the intelligence community and defense
of you know is against the nsa program. nsa, health care, immigration reform, it is all on the table for members of congress. what is your message to them? greensboro, n.c., what do you think? >> i am calling about the town hall -- caller: i am calling about the town hall meeting that was played just prior to ,washington journal" coming on and it looked like a representative was playing to the fears of the people in the audience. i am sure that he knew what they were saying, but he was just giving vague information. one person stood up and said that his -- he took his son to the hospital because his son was beaten by a dog and he talked to different people at the hospital and the comment was, get rid of the federal government. instead of the representative addressing his concern, it did not make sense. like anperson, look elderly gentleman, said he was in favor shutting down the government's. does he realize that he is receiving any kind of social security benefits or medicare that that would be shut down, too? the representative did not explain it to him. republicans just look like
the nsa. and i think that's what's giving the american people a lot of pause right now. and i think that's what needs to be explained to the american people. and congress will be reviewing this issue in section 215 of the patriot act to see if this is expanded beyond the original intent of the law. >> what actually changes, bart? do you think there's much room here to fundamentally change these programs? because all the nsa says is, look, maybe we could change who controls this meta data, which is in this virtual vault, and who has access to it and how it's kept, which may be not enough for those who think there's a problem. >> well, congress may decide not to allow the nsa or via the fbi to collect every single call record of every single american for this purpose. that's not what the president's argument sounded like in his news conference. he sounded like he wanted to, as you say, just put a little more oversight on it internally, within the executive branch, and to sort of be slightly more transparent about how it happens. his justice department put out a long white paper defending e
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 137 (some duplicates have been removed)

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